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Covid: study reveals solutions to reduce infection

Ventilation alone is not enough. The cleaning method plays a major role

Ventilation alone is not enough. The cleaning method plays a major role

A study by the University of Bristol (UK), reported in Focus magazine, states that the infectious power of the Coronavirus dissipates within 20 minutes, with the bulk of the loss occurring in the first five.

Having reaffirmed the importance of masks and distance in the prevention of Covid-19, the study highlights how much (too much?) emphasis has been placed on the importance of good ventilation in public, crowded and enclosed places, with the risk of forgetting that the real danger of contagion comes from the closest person and not from those who are far away from us.

Having established that the risk of contagion is higher when people are too close and in the first twenty minutes of breathing in close contact, it is necessary on the one hand to review prevention strategies, and on the other hand to coordinate them in order to achieve better results.

The comment of one of the researchers

The comment of one of the researchers

"If I'm having lunch with friends in the pub, the main danger is that I'll pass the Coronavirus on to my friends or they'll pass it on to me; not that it'll come from someone sitting on the other side of the pub." - said Jonathan Reid, director of the Aerosol Research Centre at the University of Bristol.

"When you move (from a positive person) not only are the aerosols diluted, but the virus is also less dangerous because, as time has passed, it has lost infectivity." This is not to say that contagion cannot occur even at a distance of metres, but it is more difficult. The risk increases in situations where you are in close contact with an infectious individual.

A different, more precise approach

A different, more precise approach

In the light of these findings, it is important to emphasise the fundamental role of a diversified and broader strategy that takes into account all the factors that can reduce the risk of infection in public places. Not only room ventilation, social distancing and masks, but also the cleanliness of these environments becomes crucial.

Equipping public places with a central vacuum system would provide a truly healthy indoor environment. This is due to the unique ability of this system to thoroughly clean any type of surface, removing micro-dust, dust mites, allergens, pollutants, bacteria and viruses from outside the building.

Ultimately, two years after the start of the pandemic and following several studies, not least that of the University of Bristol, tools such as the central vacuum system should be increasingly taken into account to ensure safer homes and public places.

The health blog