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Clean house and children's immune system

The development of the immune system in indoor environments

The development of the immune system in indoor environments

salotto e sala da pranzo pulita e luminosa

A review of studies on hygiene and the microbiota published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology has shown that the myth of the 'too clean home' not helping to build up the immune system is a false one. This is because it has actually been found that excessive household hygiene has no major effect on the ability to repel the attack of viruses and bacteria. Not only that, it has also been shown that children build up a healthy immune system even in a clean home.

According to the hygiene hypothesis (which advocates moderate exposure to germs and bacteria), letting children be exposed to microorganisms that have evolved alongside humans helps to develop an efficient immune system, and to ward off allergies and autoimmune diseases.

However, the transfer of 'good' micro-organisms to children occurs mainly through social interactions, first with the mother and then with close family members. The real factors that reduce this transfer and increase the likelihood of problems with immunological regulation are a caesarean section, lack of breastfeeding and other opportunities for closeness between mother and child, as well as frequent use of antibiotics and inadequate nutrition.

Too aggressive detergents? Better a central vacuum system

Too aggressive detergents? Better a central vacuum system

The cleaning products we use routinely reduce the presence of pathogens in our homes, but they may have a boomerang effect on the immune system and predispose to allergic reactions (such as asthma), especially if exposure is repeated and if spray cleaners and disinfectants are used. Following this reasoning, a child with obvious allergies who grew up in an 'overly clean' home may not be unhealthy because of the aseptic environment, but instead his or her ailments may be caused by the excessive use of detergents in the rooms where he or she lives.

For this reason, the installation of a central vacuum system can be the ideal solution to the problem of exposure to excessive levels of detergents while ensuring a truly clean and hygienic indoor environment by removing micro-dust, viruses, bacteria and pathogens.

schema che mosta espulsione polveri e acari all'esterno
schema che mosta espulsione polveri e acari all'esterno

The cleaning products we use routinely reduce the presence of pathogens in our homes, but they may have a boomerang effect on the immune system and predispose to allergic reactions (such as asthma), especially if exposure is repeated and if spray cleaners and disinfectants are used. Following this reasoning, a child with obvious allergies who grew up in an 'overly clean' home may not be unhealthy because of the aseptic environment, but instead his or her ailments may be caused by the excessive use of detergents in the rooms where he or she lives.

For this reason, the installation of a central vacuum system can be the ideal solution to the problem of exposure to excessive levels of detergents while ensuring a truly clean and hygienic indoor environment by removing micro-dust, viruses, bacteria and pathogens.

Immune defences and the external environment

Immune defences and the external environment

Immune defences and the external environment

Immune defences and the external environment

bambini che si tengono per mano e passeggiano in un parco

It's not just the home environment: outdoor life and contact with local biodiversity also serve to strengthen the microbiota, and they do so with microorganisms that have a different bacteriological profile, more useful than those that flourish in the home.

Exposing children to natural outdoor environments (just the park after school) increases the concentration of biomarkers in the blood that are typical of immune regulation. Even if they then return to polished homes.

The health blog